Cincinnati Traction History

Dedicated to showcasing the history of the Cincinnati area's streetcar, interurban, and railroad lines

Site Notes

07/24/16

I have split up all of the individual railroad histories into their own pages and fleshed out the history on a few of them. They're also cross-referenced with each other. I will add some images where appropriate later after everything checks out. Please let me know if any links are broken or go to the wrong pages.

Also thanks to a newly found Sanborn map, I was able to figure out the CL&A's route into the heart of Lawrenceburg. See the updated map which shows a spur to Walnut and High Streets from a junction at 3rd and Main, similar to the IR&T spur in Mt. Washington.

01/16/16

I have made a couple of updates and revisions to the map thanks to Cliff Scholes. The streetcar lines on the east side of Dayton and the D-X Rapid Transit routes have been tweaked, as well as some overall corrections to loop locations and miscellaneous tracks throughout Dayton. The route of the D&X Spring Valley branch was updated to show the correct Spring Valley terminus, as well as to show that most of the route was on a side of the road right-of-way. The interurbans in Xenia were also tweaked to show correct track endpoints. The IR&T approach into downtown Lebanon was corrected to show that it didn't return to Deerfield Road. The alignment of the C&LE through northern Colerain Township, Fairfield, and Hamilton was updated to show on-street versus side of the road right-of-way.

I was also able to add one more level of close-up zoom to the map, which makes it easier to read on high-resolution smartphone screens. It will likely require refreshing or clearing your browser cache to get the new map to display correctly. The symbol legend on the new map is over Delhi Township instead of a blank area of southeast Indiana like before.

03/29/15

I added a handful of photos of the Cincinnati, Georgetown & Portsmouth main line near the former Summerside station in Mt. Carmel, provided by Robert Jonas. They show a set of large stone bridge abutments at Hall Run creek, as well as some old railroad ties and spikes.

03/15/15

I have added numerous historic photographs to nearly every gallery on the site. Most of those are from the University of Cincinnati's Digital Resource Commons, Street Construction and Improvements Collection. Because of all the old photographs of streetcar tracks, it made the "routes and rights-of-way" and "revealed tracks" galleries somewhat redundant, not to mention unwieldy. So I have grouped all the streetcar galleries into clusters of neighborhoods where the routes can be followed somewhat linearly. There's still separate sections for things like loops, trolley poles, and carbarns. Because of all the new photographs, I have refreshed all gallery pages so they all have the same larger thumbnails and image pages. I also bumped up the thumbnail sizes on the homepage here and made the images more friendly for high-resolution displays. I don't currently have the capacity to do that for the gallery pages and images themselves, but maybe some day. Since there are a lot of under-the-hood changes, please let me know if anything is broken or missing.


About this Site
Background

The growth and development of cities throughout the world is profoundly influenced by the available modes of transportation at the time. Until the 19th Century, walking was the only way to get around town. Horses and carriages were generally only used for traveling between cities or by the wealthy. For the vast majority of folks, walking was their main mode of travel on a daily basis. Regardless of the time and the method of transit, on average people don't want to commute more than about 30 minutes. This limited the size of the walking city to about two miles across. The historical center of most European cities, as well as many east coast cities in the United States, were first developed in this walking age. The centers of London, Paris, New York, Boston, and Charleston all grew in this time. It wasn't until the introduction of the railroads that things started to change.

At first, railroads didn't affect the size of cities much. They linked the city with the countryside, spurring the growth of many country towns where farmers brought their produce to be shipped to the city by train. Here in Ohio, any town with a population over 5,000 had a railroad connection of some sort. Towns such as Loveland, Montgomery, Springdale, Sharonville, and Newtown started in this way. In the big cities though, the change was increasing industrialization of certain areas of the city where the railroads had their yards and other support facilities. With the exception of some wealthy railroad commuter suburbs like Glendale, Wyoming, and 19th century Norwood, most people still had to live within walking distance of work and their everyday needs, as the railroad was too expensive to use on a daily basis.

Although the railroads didn't start to change the growth pattern of cities significantly in themselves, some of their spin off technologies did. The development of steel rails and steam engines allowed for the construction of horsecar and cable car lines, as well as Cincinnati's famous inclines. These allowed more than just the very wealthy, who could afford to take a horse and carriage from neighborhoods like Clifton or East Walnut Hills to downtown, to start moving farther away from the increasingly crowded and polluted central city. It wasn't until the development of reliable electric traction motors that the spreading out of cities began in earnest.

In the late 1800's, slow and unreliable horsecar lines began converting to electric streetcars. While horsecar lines in some cities reached several miles from downtown, such as in Chicago, the topography of Cincinnati meant that they couldn't operate very effectively to the hilltop communities. Cable cars work great in hilly terrain like Cincinnati and San Francisco, and even Chicago had an extensive system, but they were still slow and prone to mechanical issues. Electric streetcars were much faster and more reliable, so except in a few rare cases they replaced all the horsecar and cable car lines that preceded them. The streetcar systems which developed allowed cities to grow from two miles across to nearly 10 miles. Just about every neighborhood within the boundaries of the City of Cincinnati, but outside of downtown, Over-the-Rhine, and the West End, grew during the streetcar's ascendancy.

At the same time, the interurbans took streetcar technology and applied it to longer-distance travel. They linked the city with the country much as the railroads had, but they provided more frequent and less expensive service. Unfortunately, just as quickly as the interurbans sprang up, they quickly disappeared due to competition from private automobiles and paved public highways. By the time of the Great Depression, most were gone. The streetcars hung on for another two decades, but most of them disappeared by the 1950's.

Today, all cities in the United States, and more and more around the world, are completely dependent on the automobile, and to a lesser extent the diesel bus. The many neighborhoods and towns that grew up around the streetcars, interurbans, and railroads in most cases no longer have the transportation that they were built around. They have to function in a car-oriented society, and while some have been able to survive, many of these older neighborhoods are dysfunctional in some respect if not completely failing. Few people today remember the streetcars, let alone the interurbans. Today's mainline railroads are seen more as an annoyance when a large freight train holds up traffic, and their role as the lifeblood of small towns and big cities is mostly forgotten. I hope by documenting as much of the history of these rail systems as I can, that more people will understand and appreciate the significant impact they had on the growth of not only Cincinnati, but nearly every city in the United States.

Other Resources

Many large cities around the country have web sites with information about former transit systems. It's not difficult to find maps, photos, detailed history, and commentary on the Chicago L, the New York Subway, or the Pacific Electric in Los Angeles. For smaller cities like Cincinnati, information can be pretty hard to come by. There are many very small systems in cities you wouldn't expect which are almost completely forgotten. The surface lines of Charleston, South Carolina aren't documented at all on the web, and the trolley line which connected Southern Pines with Pinehurst, North Carolina is a complete mystery. Aside from a few short descriptions, photos or maps are virtually nonexistent. This is something I am trying to supply, at least for Cincinnati.

Most of the information on Cincinnati's transit history is in books and journals, which are inaccessible on the internet. Wagner & Wright's Cincinnati Streetcars is an invaluable 10 volume collection that has numerous historical photographs, maps, diagrams, and general history. Most of the pictures have been redistributed around the internet. Much of the information, however, is not published on the web. Also, most of these volumes are out of print, and some can be rather difficult to find. The Cincinnati Historical Society Library in Union Terminal has all volumes, but they can't be checked out.

Information on the interurbans is spotty. George Hilton and John Due's The Electric Interurban Railways in America is an excellent book about the interurban industry. It has been recently republished and is readily available. However, aside from what I have quoted in the information section, there isn't much else in that book about the specific interurbans in Cincinnati. Some books have been published on individual interurbans, however. David McNeil has published books on the Cincinnati Georgetown & Portsmouth, Cincinnati & Columbus, the Cincinnati & Lake Erie, and the Cincinnati Milford & Blanchester. Some of them can be rather difficult to find. These are excellent resources, containing maps, pictures, history, news events, and numerous business records (especially for the CG&P). Nothing of much substance has been written specifically about the Cincinnati Lawrenceburg & Aurora, the Cincinnati & Hamilton, or the three Interurban Railway & Terminal lines as far as I can determine.

There is an excellent book about local railroads. The Railroad and the City by Carl Condit provides very useful information about the history of all Cincinnati's railroads, and how they've affected growth throughout the region. There is also some information on the interurbans. This book is over 25 years old now, so the latest railroad mergers by CSX and Norfolk Southern are not dealt with. It is still an excellent resource. Other railroads have been dealt with in some capacity by separate authors, such as the Cincinnati, Lebanon & Northern in John Hauck's book Narrow Gauge in Ohio, as well as the various Pennsylvania Railroad lines and some of the smaller narrow gauge systems. See the non-internet references at the bottom of this page for the full list.

The Map

The map on this site is something I put together from many drives around town, maps that I've seen in books, and information from other knowledgeable folks. Let me start by saying that this map does not represent the system as it would have appeared at any one point in time. It's more a map of where there have ever been streetcar, interurban, and railroad lines, as if you took all the maps ever made and overlaid them. The purpose behind this is for those of us who are curious about whether there are/were tracks buried under the road they're driving on, or if the trolley poles holding up the traffic lights were actually for streetcars, or if a berm in the woods might be an old right-of-way. I have tried to differentiate between active and abandoned railroads, but I cannot be certain that lines aren't abandoned or just infrequently used. Of course, all the interurbans and streetcars are gone. Other transit infrastructure such as tunnels, major viaducts, canals, and major passenger and freight stations have also been added. Most of that information has been gathered from 1912 USGS topographic maps. Therefore, some later changes may have been missed, but the overall pattern is certainly right. While I have tried to make everything as correct as possible, I cannot make any guarantees about accuracy.

Pictures

While exploring around town looking for information I took pictures of my on-site reconnaissance. There are hundreds of photos from all over the area, most starting around the year 2001. A few pictures depict scenes that have already changed, removing traces of transit history that were once obvious. While most railroad aficionados take pictures of locomotives and other train movements, my focus is on rights-of-way, and other examples of the physical plant. These are the things that most people see, but tend to ignore. What may be the obvious remains of a railroad line one day can be reduced to a mere memory after road construction or another building project. Someone could be living right on top of a line that was once an immensely important transit route for a community and not even know it. Photographs help bring to life some of the history that surrounds us.

I welcome any feedback, corrections, links, pictures, or questions you have, don't hesitate to e-mail me.


Map of Cincinnati's Streetcars, Interurbans, and Railroads
Click on the image below to open the map in a new window


Streetcars
Information
 
Historical Information

Cincinnati route data from 1925
Photographs

Anderson Ferry & Fernbank
Cincinnati Streetcar Routes

Brighton, Camp Washington, Northside, College Hill, & Winton Place
Cincinnati Streetcar Routes

Downtown & Over-the-Rhine
Cincinnati Streetcar Routes

East End & Columbia Parkway
Cincinnati Streetcar Routes

Evanston, Norwood, Pleasant Ridge, & Kennedy Heights
Cincinnati Streetcar Routes

Fairmount & Westwood
Cincinnati Streetcar Routes

Fairview, Clifton Heights, & Clifton
Cincinnati Streetcar Routes

Mt. Adams, Eden Park, Mt. Auburn, Avondale, Walnut Hills, & East Walnut Hills
Cincinnati Streetcar Routes

O’Bryonville, Hyde Park, Mt. Lookout, Oakley, Madisonville, & Mariemont
Cincinnati Streetcar Routes

Queensgate, Lower Price Hill, & Price Hill
Cincinnati Streetcar Routes

St. Bernard, Elmwood Place, Carthage, Hartwell, Wyoming, & Springdale
Cincinnati Streetcar Routes

Northern Kentucky
Cincinnati Streetcar Routes

End of Line Loops
Cincinnati Streetcar End of Line Turnaround Loops

Trolley Wire Support Poles
Cincinnati Trolley Wire Poles

Substations, Carbarns, and Shops
Cincinnati Streetcar Substations Carbarns & Shops


Interurban Railways & Suburban Railroads

General Information

CL&A - Cincinnati, Lawrenceburg & Aurora Electric Street Railroad Anderson Ferry - Aurora, IN, branch to Harrison
Standard gauge line constructed by the Cincinnati, Lawrenceburg & Aurora Electric Street Railroad in 1900
Abandoned and dismantled west of Fernbank in 1930 Remainder to Anderson Ferry purchased by the Cincinnati Street Railway, for suburban service until 1940
More Information
Main Line Photographs from Anderson Ferry to Lawrenceburg
Cincinnati, Lawrenceburg & Aurora Electric Street Railroad: Main Line

Harrison Branch Photographs Valley Junction to Harrison
Cincinnati, Lawrenceburg & Aurora Electric Street Railroad: Harrison Branch


Cincinnati & Westwood Railroad
South Fairmount - Westwood
Narrow gauge line constructed by the Cincinnati & Westwood Railroad in1874
Converted to Standard Gauge, 1891
Abandoned in 1926
More Information
Photographs from South Fairmout to Westwood
Cincinnati & Westwood Railroad


C&LE - Cincinnati & Lake Erie Railroad (College Hill Railroad, Ohio Electric Railway, Etc.)
Winton Place - Detroit, MI
Narrow gauge steam line constructed by the College Hill Railroad to Mt. Healthy in 1873
Converted to standard gauge and electrified in 1901-1902 after purchase by the Southern Ohio Traction Company
Merged into the Ohio Electric Railway and eventually reorganized as the Cincinnati & Lake Erie
Abandoned and dismantled in 1939
More Information
Main Line Photographs from Spring Grove to Mt. Healthy
Cincinnati & Lake Erie Railroad Main Line

Freight Branch Photographs from College Hill to Mt. Healthy
Cincinnati & Lake Erie Railroad Freight Line



Cincinnati & Hamilton Traction Company (Ohio Traction Company, Mill Creek Valley Line)
Hartwell - Hamilton
Broad gauge line constructed by the Cincinnati & Hamilton Traction Company in 1901
Abandoned and dismantled north of Springdale in 1926, remainder purchased by Cincinnati Street Railway for suburban service until 1932
More Information
Photographs from Hartwell to Springdale
Cincinnati & Hamilton Traction Company



IR&T - Interurban Railway & Terminal: Rapid Railway
Kennedy Heights - Lebanon
Broad gauge line constructed by the IR&T's Rapid Railway subsidiary in 1903
Abandoned and dismantled in 1922
More Information
Photographs from Pleasant Ridge to Lebanon
Interurban Railway & Terminal: Rapid Railway


IR&T - Interurban Railway & Terminal: Suburban Traction Company
Columbia - Bethel
Broad gauge line constructed by the IR&T's Suburban Traction Company in 1903
Abandoned and dismantled north of Coney Island in 1918
More Information
Photographs from California & Mt. Washington
Interurban Railway & Terminal: Suburban Traction Company



IR&T - Interurban Railway & Terminal: Cincinnati & Eastern Electric Railway
Columbia - New Richmond
Broad gauge line constructed by the IR&T's Cincinnati & Eastern Electric Railway in 1902
Abandoned and dismantled in 1922
More Information
Photographs from California and New Richmond
Interurban Railway & Terminal: Cincinnati & Eastern Electric Railway



C&C - Cincinnati & Columbus Traction Company (Hillsboro Short Line, Swing Line)
Norwood - Hillsboro
Standard gauge line constructed by the Cincinnati & Columbus Traction Company in 1906
Abandoned and dismantled in 1920
More Information
Photographs from Norwood to Hillsboro
Cincinnati & Columbus Traction Company



CM&B - Cincinnati, Milford & Blanchester Traction Company (Cincinnati, Milford & Loveland Traction Company, Milford Line, Kroger Line)
Madisonville - Blanchester
Broad gauge line constructed by the Cincinnati, Milford & Loveland Traction Company in 1903
Reorganized as the Cincinnati, Milford & Blanchester Traction Company in 1918
Abandoned and dismantled east of Milford in 1926, remainder purchased by Cincinnati Street Railway for suburban service until cut back to Mariemont in 1936, and abandoned and dismantled completely in 1942
More Information
Photographs from Madisonville to Blanchester
Cincinnati, Milford & Blanchester Traction Company



CG&P - Cincinnati, Georgetown & Portsmouth Railroad
Columbia - Georgetown, branches to California, Batavia, Russellville, and Felicity
Narrow gauge, steam line constructed by the Cincinnati & Portsmouth Railroad, 1876-1886
Renamed the Cincinnati, Georgetown & Portsmouth Railroad, 1880
Converted to Standard Gauge & Electrified, 1902
Batavia, Russellville, and Felicity & Bethel branches completed, 1903-1906
Reorganized as the Cincinnati-Georgetown Railroad Co., 1927
Service cut back and eventually abandoned, remaining route between Carrell Street and the waterworks sold to the city, 1933-1936
City/waterworks use suspended, 1943
More Information
Main Line Photographs from Columbia-Tusculum to Russellville
Cincinnati, Georgetown & Portsmouth Railroad: Main Line

California Branch Photographs from California Woods to Coney Island
Cincinnati, Georgetown & Portsmouth Railroad: California Branch

Batavia Branch Photographs from Olive Branch to Batavia
Cincinnati, Georgetown & Portsmouth Railroad: Batavia Branch



L&F - Lebanon & Franklin Traction Company
Lebanon-Franklin
Standard gauge line constructed by the Lebanon & Franklin Traction Company in 1904
Abandoned and dismantled in 1919
More Information
Photographs from Lebanon to Franklin
Lebanon & Franklin Traction Company



Railroads
Baltimore & Ohio/Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton - CSX, Cincinnati Terminal Subdivision
Former Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton/Baltimore & Ohio to Lima
Standard gauge line opened to Dayton in 1851

Downtown terminal: Baymiller Street Station (5th & Baymiller Streets)
Mostly abandoned south of Ivorydale (St. Bernard), in active use north of Ivorydale
More Information
Photographs from Queensgate to Glendale
Baltimore & Ohio/Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton - CSX, Cincinnati Terminal Subdivision



Baltimore & Ohio to Columbus - Indiana & Ohio, Midland Subdivision
Former Marietta & Cincinnati/Cincinnati Washington & Baltimore/Baltimore & Ohio to Columbus
Standard gauge line opened in stages from 1855 to 1864
Downtown terminal: Central Union Depot (3rd Street & Central Avenue)
In use
More Information

Photographs from Downtown through Loveland
Baltimore & Ohio to Columbus - Indiana & Ohio, Midland Subdivision



Baltimore & Ohio to Washington, IN - CSX, Louisville Division, Indiana Subdivision
Former Ohio & Mississippi/Baltimore & Ohio to Washington, IN
Broad gauge (6'-0") line opened in 1857, converted to standard gauge in 1871
Downtown terminal: Front & Mill Streets (Now Mehring Way & Gest Street), then Central Union Depot (3rd Street & Central Avenue)
In use except downtown terminal areas
More Information
Photographs from Queensgate
Baltimore & Ohio to Washington, IN - CSX, Louisville Division, Indiana Subdivision


Chesapeake & Ohio to Russell, KY - CSX, Cincinnati Terminal Subdivision

Former Chesapeake & Ohio to Russell, KY
Standard gauge line opened to Cincinnati in 1889
Downtown terminal: 4th Street Station (4th Street between Smith and John)
In active use
More Information

Photographs from Downtown & Queensgate
Chesapeake & Ohio to Russell, KY - CSX, Cincinnati Terminal Subdivision



Chesapeake & Ohio of Indiana - Indiana Eastern Railroad
Former Chesapeake & Ohio of Indiana to Cottage Grove, IN
Standard gauge line opened in stages between 1902 and 1910
Downtown terminal: 8th & McLean, then Baymiller Street Station (5th & Baymiller), then 4th Street Station (4th Street between Smith and John)
Dismantled south of Fernald in 1979, in limited use north of Fernald
More Information

Photographs from South Fairmount to Crosby Township
Chesapeake & Ohio of Indiana - Indiana Eastern Railroad



Cincinnati & Dayton Short Line Railroad
Standard or dual standard/broad gauge railroad proposed between Cincinnati and Dayton in the mid 1850s via deep level Deer Creek Tunnel under Walnut Hills
Never completed
More Information



Cincinnati Western Railroad
Standard gauge railroad graded between Cincinnati and Indiana in the mid 1850s
Never completed
More Information
Photographs from Mt. Airy Forest to Colerain Township
Cincinnati Western Railroad



Louisville & Nashville to Corbin, KY - CSX, Huntington West Division, CC Subdivision
Former Kentucky Central/Louisville & Nashville to Corbin, KY
Standard gauge line opened in the late 1850's
Downtown terminal: Central Union Depot (3rd Street & Central Avenue) or 4th Street Station (4th Street between Smith and John)
In active use
More Information



Louisville & Nashville LCL Subdivision - CSX, Louisville Division, LCL Subdivision
Former Louisville, Cincinnati & Lexington/Louisville & Nashville LCL Subdivision (Short Line)
Standard gauge line opened in 1869
Downtown terminal: Pan Handle Station (Pearl & Butler Streets)
In use
More Information



Louisville & Nashville, Wilder Main - CSX, Louisville Division, LCL Subdivision
Formerly part of the Louisville & Nashville LCL Subdivision (Short Line)
Standard gauge line opened in 1869
Downtown terminal: Pan Handle Station (Pearl & Butler Streets)
Dismantled north of former C&O line in Newport, KY
More Information

Photographs from Newport, KY
Louisville & Nashville, Wilder Main - CSX, Louisville Division, LCL Subdivision



New York Central/Big Four, CIND Subdivision - Indiana & Ohio, CIND Subdivision
Former Indianapolis & Cincinnati/CCC & St. L (Big Four)/New York Central to Indiana
Standard gauge line opened to Cincinnati in 1863
Downtown terminal: Central Union Depot (3rd Street & Central Avenue)
In use except downtown terminal areas
More Information

Photographs from Downtown & Cleves
New York Central/Big Four, CIND Subdivision - Indiana & Ohio, CIND Subdivision



New York Central/Big Four to Columbus - Norfolk Southern, Dayton District, Central Division
Former CCC & St. L (Big For)/New York Central to Columbus
Standard gauge line opened in 1872
Downtown terminal: Central Union Depot (3rd Street & Central Avenue)
Line begins at Ivorydale (St. Bernard) and heads north via Sharonville, Middletown, and Dayton
In active use
More Information



New York Central/Big Four, Whitewater Division - Indiana & Ohio, Brookville Subdivision
Former New York Central, Whitewater Division to New Castle, IN
Standard gauge line opened in 1862
Downtown terminal: Baymiller Street Station (5th & Baymiller Streets)
In limited local use, all track restricted to 10 mph or less
More Information



Norfolk & Western to Portsmouth - Norfolk Southern, Cincinnati District, Lake Division (Peavine) - Cincinnati East Terminal Railway
Former Cincinnati & Eastern/Cincinnati, Portsmouth & Virginia/Norfolk & Western to Portsmouth, Branch to New Richmond (abandoned in 1889)
Narrow gauge (3'-0") line opened in stages between 1876 and 1882, converted to standard gauge in 1894
Downtown terminal: Court Street Station (E. Court & Reedy Streets)
In limited local use (no through traffic) east of Clare Yard, closed to all traffic west of Clare as of September 10, 2009
More Information

Main Line Photographs from Norwood to Williamsburg
Norfolk & Western to Portsmouth - Norfolk Southern, Cincinnati District, Lake Division (Peavine)

New Richmond Branch Photographs from Newtown to New Richmond
Norfolk & Western to Portsmouth - Norfolk Southern, Cincinnati District, Lake Division (Peavine)



Norfolk & Western, Cincinnati Connecting Belt Railroad
Former Cincinnati, Portsmouth & Virginia/Norfolk & Western from Idlewild (Norwood) to Ivorydale (St. Bernard)
Standard gauge line opened in 1901
Mostly abandoned except a few connecting tracks near Ivorydale
More Information

Photographs from Evanston through Norwood
Norfolk & Western, Cincinnati Connecting Belt Railroad



Pennsylvania Railroad/Norfolk & Western to Ft. Wayne, IN - Norfolk Southern, Newcastle District
Former Eaton & Hamilton/Cincinnati, Richmond & Chicago/Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton/Pittsburgh, Cincinnati & St. Louis/Pennsylvania/Norfolk & Western Railroad to Ft. Wayne, IN
Standard gauge line opened in 1853 between New Miami and Richmond Indiana, and in 1888 between Hamilton and Rendcomb Junction
Downtown terminal: Pan Handle Station (Pearl & Butler Streets)
In active use
More Information


Pennsylvania Railroad Richmond Division - Indiana & Ohio, Oasis Subdivision
Former Cincinnati & Richmond/Pennsylvania Railroad - Richmond Division from Valley (Fairfax) to Mill (Evendale)
Standard gauge line opened in 1888
Downtown terminal: Pan Handle Station (Pearl & Butler Streets)
In limited use
More Information

Photographs from Rendcomb Jct. to Norwood
 Pennsylvania Railroad Richmond Division - Indiana & Ohio, Oasis Subdivision



Pennsylvania Railroad/Cincinnati, Lebanon & Northern - Indiana & Ohio, Blue Ash and Mason Subdivisions
Former Cincinnati Northern/Cincinnati, Lebanon & Northern/Pennsylvania to Lebanon and Dayton
Narrow gauge (3'-0") line opened in 1881, converted to standard gauge in 1894
Downtown terminal: Court Street Station (E. Court & Reedy Streets)
Mostly abandoned except limited local use from Norwood to Fields Ertel, and Mason to Lebanon
More Information

Photographs from Downtown to Lebanon
 Pennsylvania Railroad/Cincinnati, Lebanon & Northern - Indiana & Ohio, Blue Ash and Mason Subdivision



Pennsylvania Railroad/Little Miami Railroad - Indiana & Ohio, Oasis Subdivision
Former Little Miami/Pan Handle/Pennsylvania Railroad to Springfield
Standard gauge line opened in stages from 1841 to 1847.
Downtown terminal: Pan Handle Station (Pearl & Butler Streets)
Mostly abandoned except limited local use from Fairfax to downtown
More Information

Photographs from downtown Cincinnati through Xenia
Pennsylvania Railroad/Little Miami Railroad - Indiana & Ohio, Oasis Subdivision



Pennsylvania Railroad, Waterfront Belt Line
Former belt line built to connect the Little Miami and Indianapolis & Cincinnati along the Cincinnati waterfront
Standard gauge line opened in 1864
Abandoned in 1986 and dismantled west of Broadway Street in 2000
More Information

Photographs from Queensgate to the Purple People Bridge
Pennsylvania Railroad, Waterfront Belt Line



Pennsylvania Railroad, Zanesville Branch
Former Cincinnati & Muskingum Valley Railroad from Morrow to Zanesville
Standard gauge line opened between 1853 and 1856
Downtown terminal: Pan Handle Station (Pearl & Butler Streets)
Dismantled between Morrow and Wilmington, in use east of Wilmington
More Information

Photographs from Morrow to Wilmington
Pennsylvania Railroad, Zanesville Branch



Southern Railway - Norfolk Southern, Central Division, Cincinnati New Orleans & Texas Pacific 1st District
Cincinnati Southern Railway/CNO&TP
Broad gauge (5'-0") line opened to Chattanooga in 1880, converted to standard gauge in 1886
Downtown terminal: Central Union Depot (3rd Street & Central Avenue)
In active use

More Information
Photographs from Queensgate to Ludlow, KY

 Southern Railway - Norfolk Southern, Central Division, Cincinnati New Orleans & Texas Pacific 1st District



Other Transit Photos
Union Terminal
Cincinnati Union Terminal

Cincinnati Machine complex
Cincinnati Machine/Milacron

Inclines
Cincinnati Inclines

Cincinnati Subway
Cincinnati Subway

Roads & Viaducts
Cincinnati Roads & Viaducts

Street Lights, Poles, & Signals
Cincinnati Street Lights, Poles, & Signals

Miscellaneous
Other


Links to Other Transportation Sites

(All links from here on open in a new window)
Cincinnati/Ohio Transportation Related Sites

Abandoned "...a personal project aimed to document and record the abandoned and neglected buildings through text and photographs."
American Memory: Railroad Maps of Ohio A site with some high-quality scans of old railroad maps from the 19th century.
Cincinnati Dinner Train "The Cincinnati Dinner Train operates every Saturday throughout the year. Some of its features include dining for up to 108 people on two vintage dining cars. Also featured is the Queen City Tavern car with a full service cash bar, music, and two open side doors for viewing as we travel the city of Cincinnati."
Cincinnati Railroad Club "The club is a not-for-profit educational organization with an active membership of over 300. The members have a serious interest in railroads and Cincinnati area history."
Cincinnati-Transit.net A large and very thorough site "Dedicated to the history of and future plans for the city's transportation infrastructure."
Cincinnati Transit Historical Association "The CTHA is a non-profit organization dedicated to preserving transit information, photographs, ephemera and memorabilia relating primarily to the Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana region."
Cincinnati Triple Steam a volunteer effort to preserve, share, and show off the Water Works' original 1,400 ton, 104 feet high triple expansion crank and flywheel water pumping steam engines.
Dave's Electric Railroads Numerous historical photos of streetcars and trolley buses from throughout the country.
Cincinnati Street Railway
Cincinnati & Lake Erie
Ohio Electric Includes CG&P, CM&B, and the C&LE predecessor Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton.
Dayton Trolley Transit History, maps, and pictures of Dayton's transit, with emphasis on the current trolleybus system.
David Rumsey Map Collection High quality scans of many old maps of the Cincinnati area.
DuckCreek.org "Pre-Interstate Urban Archaeology, Duck Creek Road Cincinnati and Norwood, Ohio." This site has a ton of information and pictures of this road that has been mostly obliterated by I-71.
Historic Aerials "Provides free online access to historic and current aerial photography."
Kings Mills Trolley Station A description of Daniel Bingamon's home, which used to be the town's IR&T Rapid Railway station.
Light Rail Cincinnati "The Alliance for Regional Transit (ART) expects to make the civic case for higher-level transit, including light rail, in the Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky Area."
MyTopo: Historical Topographic Maps Scans of USGS maps from the early part of the 20th century.
My Road Photos "This webpage features photos (and videos since 2008) of roads, transportation features, and city skylines that I or my cohorts have taken over the years."
NOAA Historical Map and Chart Project This site has very detailed topographic maps of Cincinnati from 1912.
Search for "City of Cincinnati" as the title. The maps are listed by number. See here for a list of which maps show what neighborhoods.
The Railroads of Cincinnati Information and maps of Cincinnati's current railroads.
Rails and Trails A neat site with old USGS maps of Cincinnati and elsewhere "devoted to transportation history and the conversion of abandoned roadbeds into rail-trails"
Tom's North American Trolley Bus Pictures "A non-profit entity dedicated to educating all who have an interest on the history of trolleybuses in North America."
University of Cincinnati Digital Resource Commons "An initiative of OhioLINK and its member libraries. The DRC is a service that collects, preserves, and distributes digital material." See the Street Construction and Improvements Collection for photographs of street rehabilitation.

Other Transportation Sites

Chicago "L".org "The internet's largest resource for information on Chicago's rapid transit system."
Forgotten-NY Enormous site about everything from NYC subways and trains to lamp posts and alleys.
North Shore Line Very extensive site on the Chicago North Shore & Milwaukee Railroad.
Old Railroad Museums Collection of links to railroad museums around the country.
The Transit Stations of Arthur Gerber Information and pictures of this architect's designs for North Shore Line stations.
This site includes a drawing by yours truly.

My Other Site

Architecture Resume and Portfolio
Includes some transit related projects:
Mt. Adams Incline from a new Broadway Commons Park
Cincinnati Area Transit System (CATS)
North Shore Line Ravinia Station rendering
North Shore Line Beech Street Station rendering

Acknowledgments
Many thanks to: Jim Barrie, Bruce Bernhard, Daniel Bingamon, Jack Bonert, Brandon Brooks, Sherman Cahal, Steve Cutter, Mike Edwards, Jeff Evans, Don Faris, David Frey, David H. Fritze, Andy Harman, Jim Hetzer, Tim Hoeflich, Rick Johnson, Robert Jonas, J.E. Landrum, Phil Lind, Patrick McDermott, Jake Mecklenborg, Kyle Montgomery, Allen Morrison, Tom Morrow, Bill Myers, Rick Myers, Lee Nordloh, Mike Oestreich, Vicki Rafferty, Corwin Sapp, Cliff Scholes, Dick Segerer, Allen Singer, Michael G. Smith, Stephen Titchenal, Casey Tompkins, David Wallace, Casey Walter, Jeff Wood, and anyone else I forgot to mention, for providing helpful information and other contributions to this site.

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Lehmann, Terry W. and Earl W. Clark Jr. The Green Line: The Cincinnati, Newport & Covington Railway. Bulletin 134 of the Central Electric Railfans' Association, 2000.
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McNeil, David. Life Along the Trolley Line. Self Published, 1989.
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McNeil, David. Remembering the Cincinnati & Lake Erie RR. Self Published, 2005
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Mecklenborg, Jacob R. Cincinnati's Incomplete Subway: The Complete History. The History Press, 2010
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Singer, Allen J. Cincinnati On the Go: History of Mass Transit. Arcadia Publishing, 2004.

Singer, Allen J. The Cincinnati Subway: History of Rapid Transit. Arcadia Publishing, 2004.
Tipton, Rick and Chuck Blardone. The Pennsylvania Railroad in Cincinnati. The Pennsylvania Railroad Technical and Historical Society: 2004.
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ard M. and Birdella Wagner, editors. Two Ohio Tractions: The Miamisburg and Germantown [by Herb Pence, Jr.] and The Lebanon and Franklin [by Marion Snyder]. Trolley Talk, 1974.
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This web site was made on a Mac with Adobe GoLive and Dreamweaver. The map was made from GIS data with PowerCADD and Adobe Photoshop. Photo galleries were made with Aperture. All current photographs © 2001-2015, Jeffrey B. Jakucyk unless otherwise noted.